Yoga: Fluff or Substance?

Yoga: Fluff or Substance?

by Coach Jessica Schauls

Yoga. Your first thought is probably a nice and easy stretching routine with lots of incense, feel good feelings, and designer workout apparel with “let it be” plastered all over the front of it. And yoga can be that if you want.

Yoga can also be anything else you want it to be.

Yoga can be your go-to on an active recovery day. Yoga can help improve imbalances and mobility for better lifting form and functional movement (you don’t have to put your leg over your head). Yoga can be a challenging, sweat and pain-inducing workout if you want it be. And yoga can be fluff. Super relaxing, de-stressing, good-for-you fluff.

Personally, I’ve used yoga for all the above and more. At different stages of my life yoga has been a multi-purpose tool. I’ve practiced yoga for anything from a low-impact exercise to help recover from injuries to a high-intensity workout that combines cardio, strength, stretching and mobility work. The benefits of yoga, or “fluff” that yoga has become known for, are just icing on the cake.

 

All you have to decide is what you want your yoga to be.

Click here for a 15-minute yoga routine to get you started. Enjoy!

 

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Identifying Common Wrestling Injuries and Training Ideas to Reduce Those Risks

Identifying Common Wrestling Injuries and Training Ideas to Reduce Those Risks

by Coach Alex Nigro

Wrestling is known as one of the oldest sports in human history. Why has it stood the test of time? Because there is nothing more instinctive than 2 opponents trying to best the other. While the sport has come a long way with softer mats instead of sand, head gear, and officials overseeing the match, the risk for injury is still there. Wresting is both a full contact and collision sport. Besides the mats there is little room for absorbing those contacts. Wrestling matches are 5-10 minutes of continuous action with maximal power, strength, agility, and stamina all being pushed to the limit. With these conditions, injuries are bound to happen. It is up to the strength and conditioning coach to identify what the athlete’s weaknesses are and how best to reduce their injury risk. This article will address how structured weight training and plyometric training help reduce these risks.

According to recent NCAA data wrestling injuries are 2nd behind football. Statistics from 2003-04 found that 5.7 injuries occur during practice and 25.8 occur during a competitive outing per every 1,000 “wrestling exposures.” High school injury rates were similar. Most of these injuries happened during the “neutral” position of a wrestling match that is when both wrestlers are in a standing position. Common types of injuries are sprains, strains, cartilage issues, and bruises. Being a full contact sport there is also great risk for spinal, cervical, and brain injury. It is up to the sports coaches and strength coaches to develop strategies that make wrestlers more resilient to the common injuries, and control the environment so to minimize the risk of the severe injuries. Less than 25% of measured wrestling injuries occurred in the 1st period, leading me to believe that fatigue and stamina play a role as a match or practice progresses.

So as a strength coach what I look to influence is getting the athletes strong in extremes of the joints/muscles end ranges, working on increasing the athlete’s explosiveness and ability to handle Ground Reaction Forces with the use of plyometric training, proprioceptive/kinetic awareness aka balance, lastly increasing their conditioning and work capacity so to delay fatigue and along with that injury.

Strength training is used to build more lean tissue, strength, as well as integrity and stability in the joints. The strength coach must emphasize proper technique and taking each exercise through a full range of motion. The coach must also look for movement and muscular imbalances as they will lead to inefficient movement quality.

Plyometric training such as jumps, hops, bounds, and other fast explosive movements should be used to not only improve the wrestler’s athletic capabilities but also reduce injury risk. Plyos also train the athlete to handle ground reaction forces. In physics the ground reaction force is the force exerted by the ground on a body in contact with it. So when a wrestler lands on a limb, foot or another part of the body, he must be able to absorb these forces in a short period of time then express that energy as he continues in a match. These forces are how ankle sprains, stress fractures, and chronic knee pain occur. A strength coach will include plyometric training in the wrestler’s program so that the athlete can learn to express their strength form the weights in an explosive, athletic manner.

Strength and conditioning programs should not just be looked at as increasing athletic performance, which is certainly a main goal but also preventing the sport’s common injuries and building resiliency in the athlete. Especially for such a demanding sport such as wrestling.

 

 

References: Grindstaff, T., D. Potach. Prevention of common wrestling injuries. Strength and Conditioning Journal. 28(4), 20-28. April 2006.

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Molly Metroff’s Testimonial

My name is Molly Metroff and I’ve been a PIT member for over two years now. What motivated me to start working out in The PIT was my conversations with Coach Jesse Hawkins in trying to find goals for myself to regain strength and mobility in my right side and battle lupus. I have suffered three strokes with my Lupus which has made me weaker on my right side. Through starting The PIT I have regained strength on my right side which improved my walking and mobility.

The atmosphere and community in The Pit is great, too! It’s a very tight and inviting place for the community to go. The PIT coaches make you feel very comfortable, and the friendships you grow between other members in The PIT have really meant a lot to me.

The PIT has impacted my daily life by giving me more strength but its also helped me relieve stress and become happier with myself. My favorite exercise in The PIT are pull-ups and my least favorite is bear crawls. The PIT keeps me coming back because of the personal challenges I am able to overcome while working out in The PIT, and the relationships I’ve formed in The PIT. to people wanting to try The PIT, I encourage you to do so! It seems intimidating at first but the more you come the more you’ll start to overcome challenges you have. Coach Jesse is super motivating, too, and I wouldn’t have overcome my challenges without him or the community in The PIT. – Molly Metroff, PIT member since 2014, Lupus & Stroke Survivor

View Molly’s testimonial video here

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Know Your Why

Know the Why 

by Coach Aaron Patterson

How many times have you been asked, “What’s your ‘Why?’” It’s a question tossed around in gyms and by motivational speakers, and it is a great one. Why are you at the gym? What motivates you to keep going even when you don’t feel the greatest or feel like giving up? When it comes to training, there is another question that likely isn’t asked often enough. You are in the gym, you are motivated, you know your ‘Why,’ but now ask yourself a different question. What is THE why?

Your time is valuable, and if your schedule is like most, you want to make the most of that time. When you are performing an exercise or drill, are you doing it because you saw someone else doing it? Does it look cool, and you want to be seen doing it? Ask yourself, “What is the why?” What is the purpose as it relates to your fitness training or sports performance?

For the general population, most movements and exercises are going to enhance your overall fitness in some way. But, if you are training for a specific sport, or if you have very specific and well-defined fitness goals, how is each exercise or drill you do going to help you take that next step? Every training session should have purpose, and every movement within that session should play a role in helping you reach your goals.

You know YOUR why, now begin focusing on THE why, and you will not only find a quicker path to your goals, but you will enter every training session with new energy and purpose.

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What’s Your Why?

Tell us why you choose The PIT as your place to work out, gain strength and conditioning, join a community and most of all be a better you! Tag us on social media @ThePITBlono or @ThePITStrengthAndConditioning with the #WhatsYourWhy and be entered to win a free month in The PIT. Only one will win. Contest ends January 31, 2017.

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Central Catholic Tennis Athlete Credits her Success to The PIT

Just like any other Monday afternoon, Madison Tattini entered The PIT Strength and Conditioning center for her private training session. The music had not yet been turned on, and the room was empty. She was early for her session, but that didn’t matter to this Bloomington Central Catholic junior high school student.

She quietly walked into a changing room to exchange her school clothes for training attire, placed her hair in a ponytail, and grabbed a foam roller, ready to get to work.

It was the same routine she had repeated countless times, for much of her two years training in The PIT. But the previous weekend was anything but ordinary.

After consecutive sectional titles and trips to the IHSA girls’ state tennis tournament during her freshman and sophomore seasons, Tattini captured the ultimate prize on October 22, winning the 2016 Class A state title over rival and second ranked, Alessandra Bianco.

“When I saw the ball drop for match point, my first thought was, ‘Holy crap. I can’t believe I just made that drop shot!’ I chose a really risky shot to hit, and I honestly was not expecting it to go over,” Tattini said.

“Once I realized that I not only won the match but also won state, I saw all of my family and friends jumping up and down and I couldn’t wait to go join them celebrating.”

Tattini seemingly breezed through the state tournament winning every match in straight sets, including the championship.

She credits her success both at the high school level and on the USTA national circuit to an intense schedule training twice a week in The PIT, and working five days a week with private tennis coaches on technique and skill. On weekends, she frequently travels across the country competing in USTA tournaments.

“I have really seen an improvement in my speed and my agility on the tennis court since I started working out at The PIT,” she said. “The PIT has really allowed me to grow and better my game, and I am very thankful for their help!”

Tattini’s desire to compete at the highest level not only means staying on top of her game, but also keeping up in the classroom.

In addition to a packed tennis and training schedule, Tattini maintains a full load of AP classes, and is holding steady amongst the best in her class. The total package has drawn the attention of major Division I schools, including many in the Big Ten and Big 12 Conferences.

“Knowing that other people are practicing just as much, if not more than me, propels me to continue working hard,” she said. “Keeping my dreams in my mind and knowing that I won’t be able to go to a D-I college if I stop competing makes me work even harder.”

It will be tough to top what she has accomplished this year, but in her final high school season she hopes to defend her title, and help her team improve on its third place finish. Until then, she will continue to compete during the offseason, working her way up in the USTA national rankings.

Despite the busy schedule, Tattini does take time on occasion to relax and be a normal teen. In fact, immediately after receiving her state championship medal, Tattini and her dad made their way from Buffalo Grove High School to Wrigley Field where they witnessed the Chicago Cubs defeat the Los Angeles Dodgers to clinch their first pennant in 71 years.

“I can definitely say that the week of state finals was one of the best weeks of my life,” she said. “(Even after winning state) getting to see the Cubs clinch the NLCS and go to the World Series brought my excitement to another level. To add to my amazing day, once the game was over, Kris Bryant came over to our section and gave my dad and I a high five, looked us in the eye, and told us thank you for coming.

“I was in shock! I like to believe that Kris Bryant was actually giving me a high five for having such an amazing day.”

If Bryant knew, perhaps he would have congratulated her on winning state. And if her work ethic and drive are any indication of future success, she will likely have many more exciting days, similar to her experience on October 22.

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Interval Training: How and Why

Interval training is, in my opinion, the best way to get the most out of your workout. Most of us are too busy to spend more than an hour a day working out when we have obligations to work, kids, social life, and so on and interval training is a great way to get a lot out of a workout in a minimal amount of time.

Interval training is working for short periods of time at a high intensity, followed by recovery periods that usually constitute simply resting. One of the main benefits of interval training is that you’ll burn a lot more calories in a small amount of time. Multiple studies indicate that steady state exercise (such as jogging) at a moderate pace (at about 65% max) for 40-60 minutes and interval training (near 95-100% max) favor the group that does interval training for 15-minutes when it comes to calorie expenditure. Not only can you burn more calories much faster, but interval training has the effect of burning calories two hours after you exercise. Exercise post oxygen consumption (EPOC), is the amount of oxygen required to return your body back to a resting level of function. EPOC has been shown to add 6-15% calorie expenditure to a workout for about two hours after a session (McCall, 2014).  So if you burn 500 calories in a short 10-30 minute interval training session, it is possible that you burn an additional 30-75 calories during the next 2-hour period, even if that means you’re lying on the couch.

Another benefit, in my opinion, is that interval training is more fun and something you’re more likely to stick to. I’ve always hated the long, tedious runs on the treadmill or out on the bike path, and prefer to get after it for a short period of time and feel like I’ve really taxed my body. And for the runners that are ready to come in and tell me how enjoyable a 20-mile run is, which you will never be able to convince me of, there is a benefit to you as well. Interval training has proved to help boost endurance too, as it increases your oxidative capacity VO2max, which is a measure of how much oxygen gets to the muscle during aerobic exercise. So if you want to perform better in your next long, boring (just kidding…kind of) triathlon, mix in a day or two of interval training to your regimen. I could continue on with the many benefits of interval training (heart health, insulin sensitivity, hormone production) but I’ll continue on to offer some progressive programs for you to try out on your own.

Again, as I know that a lot of you reading this are members of The PIT or prospective members, I’ll relate this to how you could program out a 5-day period of workouts. Most people attend group fitness classes either in The PIT or at other facilities 2-3 times per week. Let’s say you attend Monday, Wednesday, and Friday but think that you could sneak in 10-30 minutes on at least one other day a week (everyone can). Tuesday and/or Thursday would be ideal for interval training. Pick an exercise you like, such as sprinting, Airdyne Bike, rowing machine, burpees, kettlebell swings, battle rope, or anything else you can think of that makes you gasp for breath in a short period of time. Can’t get into the gym? You could still do burpees, mountain climber, jump rope, or even treadmill sprints in the comfort of your own home. Looking at the first week we have a very manageable 11-minute workout. As the weeks go on the workouts get slightly harder, with either less rest, longer duration, or both. If you decide to go through the entire 30 weeks, you would still only be training for 24-minutes at the most. For those that feel that they are more advanced, I would recommend starting at week four or later, or starting at the beginning with 3-week splits of 10,12, and 15 instead of the 8,10,12 repetition pattern that you see. Remember, the absolute key to this is that you perform at near 100% effort. If you decide to use sprint intervals, SPRINT!  If this seems too hard at first, go as hard as you can for as many repetitions as possible with the goal of doing 1 or 2 repetitions more the following week. For those of you that hate doing one thing continuously, I have also included a body weight circuit that you can do in your home and is set up in a continuous progressive manner. It wouldn’t be bad to do one day of the body weight circuit, one day of the interval training, and 2-3 days of your group fitness class to reach maximum results.

Also, remember members, that if you are signed up for the three days/week package, you are limitless! So you can make your three days/week of traditional sessions and come to our MyZone classes up to three other days during the week. The MyZone classes are based on the interval training principles we have discussed and they are only 45-minutes long. Hope this article was helpful and I urge you to try to get at least one day of intense interval training in each week.

Thanks,

Nick Nundahl C.S.C.S.
PIT Coach and Personal Trainer
Four Seasons Health Club
Nick Photo PIT


For a printable version of the interval workouts provided below, click here


WEEKS 1-3

WEEK 1 WORK 20 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 2 WORK 20 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 3 WORK 20 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 4-6

WEEK 4 WORK 30 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 5 WORK 30 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 6 WORK 30 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 7-9

WEEK 7 WORK 30 SECS: REST 45 SECS (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 8 WORK 30 SECS: REST 45 SECS (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 9 WORK 30 SECS: REST 45 SECS (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 10-12

WEEK 10 WORK 30 SECS: REST 30 SECS (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 11 WORK 30 SECS: REST 30 SECS (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 12 WORK 30 SECS: REST 30 SECS (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 13-15

WEEK 13 WORK 45 SECS: REST 1 MIN 30 SECS (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 14 WORK 45 SECS: REST 1 MIN 30 SECS (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 15 WORK 45 SECS: REST 1 MIN 30 SECS (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 16-18

WEEK 16 WORK 45 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 17 WORK 45 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 18 WORK 45 SECS: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 19-21

WEEK 19 WORK 45 SECS: REST 45 SECS (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 20 WORK 45 SECS: REST 45 SECS (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 21 WORK 45 SECS: REST 45 SECS (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 22-24

WEEK 22 WORK 1 MIN: REST 2 MIN (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 23 WORK 1 MIN: REST 2 MIN (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 24 WORK 1 MIN: REST 2 MIN (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 25-27

WEEK 25 WORK 1 MIN: REST 1 MIN 30 SECS (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 26 WORK 1 MIN: REST 1 MIN 30 SECS (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 27 WORK 1 MIN: REST 1 MIN 30 SECS (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

WEEKS 28-30

WEEK 28 WORK 1 MIN: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 8 TIMES)

WEEK 29 WORK 1 MIN: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 10 TIMES)

WEEK 30 WORK 1 MIN: REST 1 MIN (REPEAT 12 TIMES)

BODY WEIGHT CIRCUIT

WEEK 1                                             WEEK 2                                             WEEK 3

BURPEES X 10                                 BURPEES X 12                                 BURPEES X 15

PUSHUPS X 10                                PUSHUPS X 12                                 PUSHUPS X 15

SQUATS X 15                                   SQUATS X 18                                   SQUATS X 20

JUMP SQUATS X 12                      JUMPS SQUATS X 15                      JUMP SQUATS X 18

SL SITUPS X 10                                SL SITUPS X 12                                SL SITUPS X 15

FLUTTER KICKS X 20 EA.                       FLUTTER KICKS X 25 EA.               FLUTTER KICKS X 30 EA.

MTN. CLIMBER X 30 SECS.                    MTN CLIMBER X 35 SECS.               MTN. CLIMBER X 40 SECS.

PLANK X 40 SECS.                          PLANK X 45 SECS.                       PLANK X 50 SECS.

3 ROUNDS                                           3 ROUNDS                                3 ROUNDS

 

WEEK 4                                             WEEK 5                                             WEEK 6

BURPEES X 10                                 BURPEES X 12                                 BURPEES X 15

PUSHUPS X 10                                 PUSHUPS X 12                                 PUSHUPS X 15

SQUATS X 15                                   SQUATS X 18                                     SQUATS X 20

JUMP SQUATS X 12                        JUMPS SQUATS X 15                    JUMP SQUATS X 18

SL SITUPS X 10                                SL SITUPS X 12                                SL SITUPS X 15

FLUTTER KICKS X 20 EA.             FLUTTER KICKS X 25 EA.           FLUTTER KICKS X 30 EA.

MTN. CLIMBER X 30 SECS.          MTN CLIMBER X 35 SECS.          MTN. CLIMBER X 40 SECS.

PLANK X 40 SECS.                          PLANK X 45 SECS.                          PLANK X 50 SECS.

4 ROUNDS                                        4 ROUNDS                                        4 ROUNDS

 

References

McCall, Pete. “7 Things to Know About Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption

(EPOC).” Www.acefitness.org. 28 Aug. 2014. Web. 23 May 2016.

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Nutrition for Athletes: Why does it matter?

  • Do you eat a pre-game or pre-workout meal 2-3 hours before performance (game, practice or strength training)?
  • Do you fuel yourself through a long, high intensity performance with appropriate carbohydrates (gatorade, etc) and water?
  • Do you faithfully eat a snack, protein shake, or meal within 30 minutes of a workout or game?
  • Do you hydrate properly throughout the day?
  • Do you fuel yourself with high quality foods, not fast/fried/processed food?
  • Do you eat enough to support your high level of training?

If you answered no to any or all of these questions, you need to ask yourself the question:
Do you take yourself seriously as an athlete?

Google what a serious athlete like Lebron James, JJ Watt, or Alex Morgan eats. Seriously. Do it. Pick your favorite athlete and Google “What does ________ (fill in the blank with any famous athlete) eat?” Each search result will come back with that athlete reporting eating high quality foods like fruits, vegetables, and healthy protein in enough quantities to fuel the amount of effort they are exerting in games, practice, and strength training. It will not say they are eating fried foods, sugar, or processed foods on a regular basis. This is because they know these types of food do not support one’s body for high levels of competition, but actually hinders the body’s recovery time and performance.

The point? If you are not eating what an elite athlete is eating, don’t expect to be one.

But I hope if you are training in The PIT, you want to be taken seriously as an athlete. To do so, start taking yourself seriously by fueling your body right. Respect yourself and your body for the sweat, guts, and effort you give in The PIT for 90 minutes every day.

If you are training in The PIT, you are not a normal, average individual – and you shouldn’t want to be. You want to be exceptional. And to be exceptional at your sport, you need to be exceptional with your nutrition. You probably won’t be eating the junk your friends are eating and you need to be okay with that. You will be making different, healthy eating choices. Be proud about that because you are taking care of your body that is performing at high levels for you and will only continue to do so if you continue putting the right nutrition in it’s tank.

Eating right is the easiest way to get a step ahead of the competition. Everyone can eat, but not everyone has the talent to make it in a sport. Don’t make bad nutrition the reason why you aren’t at the top of your game.

So, I’ll ask you again: Do you take yourself seriously as an athlete?

By Coach Jessica Schauls
JessicaDulski

Want to learn more from Coach Jessica? Sign up for one of her classes to try The PIT out for free.

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Building the Foundation Part III: Type of Squat

Now that we know how and why we squat in The PIT (look back to Building the Foundation Part I and Part II – if you haven’t already read those, do so before moving onto Part III).

In The PIT, we work through a Bodyweight Squat -> Goblet Squat -> Front Squat progression. While it is true that mechanically an individual can lift the absolute most weight squatting with the bar on the back, be it high bar or low bar, by anteriorly loading the weight we find it easier to teach athletes to maintain proper spinal integrity and reach full range of motion.

Examples of the 3 main squat types.

front squat

Front squatting provides an excellent stimulus to the collection of knee and hip extensors as well as the spinal stabilization components of the abdominals and spinal erectors. These muscle groups are some of the most critical groups athletes use in performing explosive and powerful movements. In training the front squat, we are developing not only rapid force production and maximal strength, but also the stability and mechanics to remain healthy throughout the entirety of a grueling season.

Stay tuned to thepitbloomington.com and The PIT Strength and Conditioning on Facebook for more in depth movement analysis, trainer tips, community updates, and more.

Dylan Ray
PIT Coach
IMG_8314

Want to try a free demo? Fill out the form here:

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Building the Foundation Part II: How We Squat

Now that we understand why squatting 10612900_769186536472601_1869570099983638043_ngoes hand-in-hand with athletic success and overall well-being let us examine the ‘how.’ (If you don’t know what I’m talking about, read Building the Foundation Part I: Why We Squat – then come back!)

Our first teaching point is instilling the importance of proper foot placement. For the entire squat progression, feet should be placed with heels slightly wider than shoulder width, toes turned out slightly at a 5-10 degree angle. Our athletes are then taught to activate their glutes during the squat by externally rotating their femurs, often cued as ‘corkscrewing’ their feet or ‘spreading the floor.’ This ensures that from the get-go the posterior chain is activated, something that many chair-borne athletes may initially lack the ability to perform.

Next, our athletes are taught to brace their abdominal structure. This is first taught with our diaphragmatic breathing warm ups and ensures spinal integrity through the full range of motion. Athletes are to take a deep breath in using their diaphragm, or ‘belly breathing’, as opposed to merely inflating the upper portion of their lungs by only breathing with the chest. Once the entire lung cavity is filled, our athletes then push that interstitial pressure down and into their lower back, effectively activating their deep abdominal support structures.

After bracing, our athletes begin the squat by first breaking at the hips and then descending straight down between the ankles, while at the same time keeping the chest as upright as possible. Making sure to continue to externally rotate the femurs, the athlete descends with balance kept towards the heel of the midfoot and makes sure the patella of the knees track towards the second toes. It is imperative that the knees maintain this position and do not collapse inward. Inward (valgus) collapse puts undue sheer stress forces on the ligaments of the knees and should be avoided.

Many athletes first undergoing squat correction may experience difficulty in maintaining an upright chest angle during the descent and at the bottom position. There are a variety of factors at play here, and our PIT coaches are adept at determining the cause and solution to this movement restriction. Once athletes reach the bottom position, they drive forcefully through the heels and midfoot and returns to the starting position.

Stay tuned for the final section of our foundation lesson, Building the Foundation Part III: What We Squat.

Dylan Ray
PIT Coach
IMG_8314

 

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